DC Needs More Women in Political Office

DC currently has an all-time low percentage of women in elected office. It's time to change that.


  • published Covid 19, Family 100% Vaxxed Campaign in Blog 2022-01-05 23:34:57 -0500

  • published Covid 19 Vaccination 101 Knowledge Test in Surveys 2022-01-05 20:42:58 -0500

  • published Membership Survey in Join 2021-12-13 20:36:36 -0500

    Membership Survey

    Please take a couple of minutes to let us know what you are interested in working on as a member of DCWIP.

    Take the survey

  • published 2021 Campaign School Evaluation in Surveys 2021-11-13 17:11:22 -0500

    Evaluation

    2021 Mazie Green-Holland Women’s Campaign School
    Evaluation/Feedback Form

    Take the survey


  • published Rank Choice Voting Position in Blog 2021-03-18 18:16:24 -0400

    DCWIP Rank Choice Voting (RCV) Position

    DCWIP has reviewed the current proposed DC Legislation for Ranked Choice Voting (RCV).  RCV in multi-winner districts is also known as the "single transferable vote". In this process, the ballot shall allow voters to rank candidates for each office in order of preference equal to the total number of candidates for each office; provided that if the voting system, vote tabulation or similar related equipment used by the District cannot feasibly accommodate choices equal to the number of candidates running for office, then the Board of Elections may limit the number of choices a voter may rank to no fewer than three (3).

    DCWIP has concluded that the organization will not support the legislation for DC.

    View the entire position-paper here.

    Based on both the analytical data and empirical assessments reviewed and vetted by the Executive Committee of DC Women in Politics, we have determined that Rank Choice Voting (RCV) is not a legislative proposal that we can or would recommend or support for the District of Columbia. 

    Please click here to register your vote in support of not adopting Ranked Choice Voting in DC.

     

     

    Read more

  • published Mazie Green Holland Campaign School Donation in Join 2020-12-28 16:12:30 -0500

  • published Watch the Winning Circle in Blog 2020-11-14 17:25:26 -0500

    Watch the Winning Circle

    Come Into the Winning Circle

    with 

    Christina Henderson, At-Large City Council

    Brooke Pinto, Ward 2 City Council

    Janeese Lewis George, Ward 4 City Council

    They won because of YOU, the Women’s Vote.

    Watch it here: 

    https://www.facebook.com/DcWomenInPolitics/videos/874404409966190/?v=874404409966190

    • Get to know the women newly elected to the city council. We asked the hard questions and they answered.
    • In case you missed The Winning Circle, we recorded it for you.
    • Please take an hour to hear from your newly elected officials and learn what their goals and priorities are.
    • We are looking forward to working with all three of them!

    You can help support DC Women in Politics by giving to its “7 for 7” Campaign. 

    _󠄊__$7     󠄊___$27󠄊   󠄊___$57   󠄊___$107      󠄊___Other $____

    You can make your contribution at: https://www.dcwomeninpolitics.org/membership

    (or send a check made out to:
    DC Women in Politics 
    1324 Kenyon Street, NW
    Washington DC 20010)

    DC Women in Politics has diligently worked, along with many others, to elect 7 women to the DC Council.  

     


  • published Other Amount in Join 2020-11-07 14:46:05 -0500

  • published Introductory Membership in Join 2020-11-07 14:36:02 -0500

  • published Vote a Women's Ballot in Blog 2020-11-01 17:22:26 -0500

    Vote a Women's Ballot

    VOTE A WOMEN’S BALLOT

    WHEN YOU VOTE, and WHEN YOUR FRIENDS VOTE, THEY WILL WIN

    DC WOMEN IN POLITICS RECOMMENDS VOTING

    TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3RD

    Congressional

    • Eleanor Holmes Norton -- Delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives from the District of Columbia
    • Eleanor Ory -- United States Senator

    Member of the Council of the District of Columbia

    • Christina Henderson -- At-Large
    • Brooke Pinto -- Ward 2
    • Janeese Lewis George -- Ward 4

    State Board of Education

    • Dorothy Douglas -- At-Large
    • Sarah Mehrotra -- Ward 2
    • Ebony-Rose Thompson -- Ward 7
    • Carlene D. Reid -- Ward 8

    Here are some ways to win:

    If you have any questions, feel free to contact Anita Shelton at [email protected] or 202-234-9089.

    Please join us as a member of DC Women in Politics here. 


  • Vote Christina Henderson for DC Council At-Large--#1 on the Ballot

    Earlier this Fall, DC Women in Politics endorsed Christina Henderson for DC Council At-Large. Henderson has rich experience working at the DC Council and in government. She is a progressive advocate for women and families and will be an independent thinker. When women vote, Henderson will win by 10 points.

    Are you in? Here are some ways to help:

    Vote for Christina Henderson for DC Council At-Large. She is #1 on the ballot.

    If you have any questions, feel free to contact Anita Shelton at [email protected] or 202-234-9089.

    Please join us as a member of DC Women in Politics here. 

     


  • DCWIP Announces Endorsements for DC State Board of Education and Congressional Candidates

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Contact: Anita Shelton, 202-234-9089
    [email protected] 

    DC Women in Politics Announces Endorsements for DC State Board of Education and Congressional Candidates

    WASHINGTON, DC, October 5, 2020 — DC Women in Politics (DCWIP) announces its endorsements following its virtual town hall which included a panel discussion featuring the women candidates running for the DC State Board of Education (SBOE) and other Congressional races.

    “In 30 days, DC voters will elect an array of female candidates. We affirm that women best represent women and children's budget and legislative needs on the DC City Council and in Congress. The women’s wave will flip two male seats in Wards 2 and 4, and help elect a total of seven progressive women for a historical majority female council. Let’s vote up and down the ticket from the first female Vice President, Kamala Harris, to Christine Henderson, At-Large Councilmember. Also, elect four State Board of Education Members and more women to Congressional Seats,” says Anita Shelton, President of DCWIP.

    The virtual event attracted more than 600 viewers on Facebook.  The candidates spoke about various issues impacting District residents, and especially women, children and families who have been hardest hit by COVID-19. Following the town hall, a Preference Poll gave attendees the opportunity to cast their vote for their choice of the best qualified candidates. Seven female candidates are running for SBOE seats and three for other Congressional seats. Below are the candidates selected and their accompanying statement presented for the town hall.

    DC State Board of Education Candidates

    Congressional Candidates

    • Delegate, U.S. House of Representatives: Eleanor Holmes Norton

    Statement: https://www.dcwomeninpolitics.org/eleanor_holmes_norton

     

    DC Women in Politics is organizing to elect the seventh woman to the Council of the District of Columbia, establishing a female majority for the first time.

    # # #

     

    ABOUT DC WOMEN IN POLITICS

    DC Women in Politics is a diverse nonpartisan, nonprofit women’s leadership organization. Our mission is to increase the number of women elected to public office and to monitor their legislative and advocacy actions on issues that impact women and families. For more information about DC Women in Politics visit www.dcwomeninpolitics.org on Twitter @dcwomen_politcs and DCWomenInPolitics on Facebook.

     


  • DC Women in Politics Endorses Christina Henderson for At-Large Member of the Council of the District of Columbia

    DC Women in Politics Touts Historic Election As Council Poised to Elect Female Majority, and Endorses Christina Henderson for At-Large Member of the Council of the District of Columbia

    WASHINGTON, DC — DC Women in Politics (DCWIP) announces that it has endorsed Christina Henderson for At-Large member of the Council of the District of Columbia.

    Of the eight women competing in a crowded field of 24 candidates, Christina received the resounding approval of 68% of the votes cast in the DCWIP Preference Poll following the Virtual Town Hall viewed by 1,600 people on Facebook.

    Christina’s stance on escalating childcare costs; delivery of healthcare especially during the COVID-19 pandemic; and affordable housing to help families who’ve been in DC for generations stay in DC, led DCWIP members to believe she is the best candidate for At-Large member of the Council of the District of Columbia.

    DC Women in Politics is organizing to elect the seventh woman to the Council of the District of Columbia, establishing a female majority for the first time. “A historic election of a seventh woman to the Council of the District of Columbia would bring increased sensitivity to citizen needs, compromise across party lines, and produce a maintainable future,” Shelton said.

    During the first DCWIP Virtual Town Hall on Sept. 10th, the candidates spoke about various issues impacting District residents, and especially women, children and families who have been hardest hit by COVID-19. The candidates that participated are: Claudia Barragan, Christina Henderson, Jeanne’ Lewis, Monica Palacio, Marya Pickering, and Ann Wilcox.

    Following the town hall, a Preference Poll gave attendees the opportunity to cast their vote for their choice of the best qualified candidate. The winner of the Preference Poll is Christina Henderson.

     

    # # #

     

    ABOUT DC WOMEN IN POLITICS

    DC Women in Politics is a diverse nonpartisan, nonprofit women’s leadership organization. Our mission is to increase the number of women elected to public office and to monitor their legislative and advocacy actions on issues that impact women and families. For more information about DC Women in Politics visit www.dcwomeninpolitics.org on Twitter @dcwomen_politcs and DCWomenInPolitics on Facebook


  • published TownHall 2020 2 Web Page in Calendar 2020-09-15 16:12:57 -0400

  • published PrefPoll_2_2020 Web Page 2020-09-15 16:07:03 -0400

  • published Karen Williams in 2020 BOE and City-Wide Candidates 2020-09-12 16:13:29 -0400

    Karen Williams

    RSVP here for Virtual Town Hall with BOE and other City-Wide Candidates September 16, 2020 at 6:30pm.

    Hello. My name is Karen Williams and I am the current Ward 7 representative on the D.C. State Board of Education (SBOE), a 5th generation Washingtonian who is a proud product of D.C. Public Schools (Go Ballou Knights!), and a former educator in the DCPS system.

    Working at Stanton Elementary School in Ward 8, helping children East of the River faced with many social and emotional obstacles, fueled my desire to serve on the State Board of Education. Creating equitable educational opportunities for all DCPS students, providing early intervention services for at-risk students and creating opportunities for D.C. children to succeed has been the primary focus of my entire educational career.

    My experience in education policy, public safety, and community organizing are vitally important on the Board of Education. As Vice President and President of the State Board, I put students first, launching our Student Advisory Committee, giving students a bigger voice in Board discussions and operations, and initiating the Board’s District-wide initiative on the retention of qualified teachers.

    My legislative work on the State Board includes collaborating with the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) on the development of the “No Child Left Behind” waivers and graduation requirements, and working with members of SBOE on credit flexibility regulations, as well as the development of the State Diploma for students completing the GED or NEPD programs.

    COVID-19 has shown us our first priority should be to promote the need for DC students and teachers to have safe and well-equipped school environments – clean and well-maintained physical structures, complete staffing and the necessary tools for learning.

    To me, quality education is a right all of our students deserve, and I have the relationships to ensure continued change provides opportunities to underserved and at-risk students.

     

    Return to beginning >>

     

     


  • Eboni-Rose Thompson

    RSVP here for Virtual Town Hall with BOE and other City-Wide Candidates September 16, 2020 at 6:30pm.

    Eboni-Rose Thompson, Candidate DC SBOE Ward 7


    Charter Schools vs. DCPS

    Ever-increasing enrollments in DCPCS forced the DCPS chancellor to propose closing fifteen DC Public Schools in an effort to manage scarce resources more efficiently. It’s been more than a decade since DC adopted Charter Schools. Name a specific benefit and challenge with both entities? If elected, what goals do you expect to provide?

    We need a comprehensive plan with a vision for our public education system. That plan should detail how many schools we have and what programs they provide. Without that, we will continue to have what we have now. We will continue to open more schools, stretch resources, and still have families who say we do not have enough high quality schools. Within that plan both DC Public Schools and DC charter schools can contribute their benefits, and we can mitigate their challenges. DC Public Schools benefits are that they serve all children but they have not been able to educate all children equally, which is why many families in Ward 7 do not attend their neighborhood schools in search of higher quality programs. Charter schools have more flexibility to be innovative but lack transparency in their policies and practices, such as how they handle discipline and spend their money.

    If elected, I would work towards the following key accomplishments:

    • reclaiming greater power over the public education landscape and decision-making
    • the board developing a comprehensive education plan that will ensure every student have a high-quality education no matter where they live

    These are both important because they will improve accountability and transparency for schools, families and educators.

    Mental Health

    According to the CDC Mental Disorders among children are described as serious changes in the way children typically learn, behave, or handle their emotions, which cause distress and problems getting through the day. Childhood trauma, being one aspect, is prevalent in some poverty to low income households. If elected, what can voters expect from you to improve this dilemma amongst school age children’s mental health?

    If elected, I would continue to advocate to increase funding for mental health providers to be placed in schools. As chair of the Ward 7 Education Council, I have testified in front of the DC Council advocating for increases to at-risk and mental health funding, both of which can be used to support positions like school counselors, social workers, and school psychologists.  Increasing the number of school based mental health workers is important for the following reasons: 1) their ability to consistently provide care allows clinicians to establish and maintain the relationships needed with families to work towards solutions together; 2) when placed in schools clinicians can support the well-being of the entire school and can work with families, staff and the community more broadly; 3) often it is the most vulnerable that have the most difficulty accessing services due to lack of insurance and placing providers in schools can make sure they are better served.

    Preparing Students academically

    According to the Non-profit Hechinger Report each year, when they get to campus, more than half a million American college students have to take so-called remedial or developmental education classes to teach them basic math and English skills they should have learned in high school. Main-stream media and written newspaper articles have constantly reported how DC students are ill prepared for college and the workforce after Secondary Graduation. If elected what would be a priority of yours to change this dilemma?

     

    I am a native Washingtonian and product of DCPS and DC Charter Schools. I went on to earn my degree from the University of Pennsylvania. After graduating I returned home to work for DC Public Schools. As a DCPS employee, I was able to serve my neighborhood elementary school, the same elementary school I attended from PreK through 5th grade. I share the SBOE vision that we prepare all students with the skills, knowledge and abilities to lead productive lives as engaged citizens within any community.

    My vision for education is all students be prepared to graduate and go on to post-secondary or technical training opportunities that put them on the pathways to fulfilling careers that could pay them a living wage. As a member of the State Board of Education I will continue fighting for academic standards, measures of school quality, and the resources to make this vision a reality. As the Ward 7 SBOE representative, I will push and advocate for us to:

    • focus resources on students and communities with the greatest need
    • provide transparency in budgeting and decision making
    • expand the quantity and quality of programs in our schools.

    Education

    The Coronavirus pandemic has brought on new challenges in the classroom of learning.  In DC textbooks, laptops and school materials are the necessities for a quality learning environment within a classroom setting. The American Academy of Pediatrics, a national association of pediatricians, issued guidance July 1, 2020 advocating for in-person classes in the fall. Remote learning, the academy said, will likely result in severe learning loss and social isolation that can lead to serious emotional and health issues for students. If elected, what improvements would you promote to implement during these challenging times?

    This school year is unlike any other we have faced. The decision when to return to schools in-person must be a health and safety decision first and foremost. As a member of the Mayor’s ReOpen DC committee focused on education, I pushed for the city to invest in closing the digital divide so students and their families remain connected to schools. This is especially important so students can connect with their teachers for academic instruction, but they also need the internet and a device to access other services for general health and mental health services.

     

    Additionally, I would promote the city exploring options like learning pods, use of community resources like churches who have space and volunteers that can provide tutoring to students who need additional support, and ensuring special needs children have individualized learning plans that detail how supports will be provided to meet their needs until we can return to in-person instruction.

    Finally, in my role as the Ward 7 Education Council Chair, we are advocating to ensure the necessary improvements are made to school facilities like addressing HVAC and ventilation issues to allow educators and students to return in person. I would continue that advocacy.

    Teachers

    On July 1, 2020 DCIST reported Teachers in D.C. Public Schools are pushing back against preliminary plans to reopen schools in the fall, arguing the city school system has not adequately addressed health and safety concerns.

    Before the pandemic challenges, teachers were being physically and mentally abused in one-on-one personal classroom settings and the students’ behavior has become a big challenge. How do you see yourself being able to address these concerns?

    Students of color, with disabilities, and in the foster care system In DC are overwhelmingly and disproportionately suspended and expelled. The Fair Access to School Act, a school discipline bill passed by the DC Council in 2018, pushed schools to incorporate restorative justice practices, but many schools had trouble addressing student behaviors without adequately staff and resources. Before the bill, black children in DC were nearly eight times more likely to be suspended than their white peers. Students cannot learn if they are not in school. When fewer kids are suspended, data shows test scores improve. Addressing the root cause behind each child’s behavior leads to a long-term solution that helps every child in the classroom learn and succeed. This is another reason I will continue to advocate for schools to have the necessary funding for school based mental health resources.

     

    Next Candidate >>


  • published Dr. Carlene Reid in 2020 BOE and City-Wide Candidates 2020-09-12 16:12:43 -0400

    Dr. Carlene Reid

    RSVP here for Virtual Town Hall with BOE and other City-Wide Candidates September 16, 2020 at 6:30pm.

    Charter Schools vs. DCPS

    Ever-increasing enrollments in DCPCS forced the DCPS chancellor to propose closing fifteen DC Public Schools in an effort to manage scarce resources more efficiently. It’s been more than a decade since DC adopted Charter Schools. Name a specific benefit and challenge with both entities? If elected, what goals do you expect to provide?

    A challenge of DCPS is chronic underfunding. Traditional public schools in Ward 8 are still recovering from the effects of segregation and redlining which prevented minority families from equally accessing educational opportunities. Therefore, these schools in particular need increased funding to support inequities caused by systemic racism and oppression. Charter schools bring elements of innovation to education; however the influx of charters in the ward has led to instability in our educational system as some have not been able to remain open due to performance or financial difficulty. If elected my goal is to engage neighbors around a moratorium on opening new schools in Ward 8, as our current system continues to bring in new schools at a rate faster than it is able to fund or monitor for accountability and quality improvement efforts. Instead, my focus will be on fortifying the current schools in the ward, both DCPS and charter.

    Mental Health

    According to the CDC Mental Disorders among children are described as serious changes in the way children typically learn, behave, or handle their emotions, which cause distress and problems getting through the day. Childhood trauma, being one aspect, is prevalent in some poverty to low income households. If elected, what can voters expect from you to improve this dilemma amongst school age children’s mental health?

    First, I believe a universal screening for adverse childhood events (ACES) should be provided to all children regularly and at multiple touch points in their educational journeys. Second, I would advocate for funding services for families who are not eligible for medicaid reimbursement and frequently denied mental health supports by for profit community based organizations. My advocacy would include families who may be undocumented, have no insurance, or private insurance.

    Preparing Students academically

    According to the Non-profit Hechinger Report each year, when they get to campus, more than half a million American college students have to take so-called remedial or developmental education classes to teach them basic math and English skills they should have learned in high school. Main-stream media and written newspaper articles have constantly reported how DC students are ill prepared for college and the workforce after Secondary Graduation. If elected what would be a priority of yours to change this dilemma?

    One priority would be to reduce the pressure for teachers to expedite learning experiences caused by standardized testing. Additionally, I will advocate for our teachers to have adequate professional development opportunities (i.e college coursework, licensure maintenance, conferences, etc.) to keep them abreast of current instructional methodologies that research has proven to render the most fruitful outcomes in students.

    Education

    The Coronavirus pandemic has brought on new challenges in the classroom of learning. In DC textbooks, laptops and school materials are the necessities for a quality learning environment within a classroom setting. The American Academy of Pediatrics, a national association of pediatricians, issued guidance July 1, 2020 advocating for in-person classes in the fall. Remote learning, the academy said, will likely result in severe learning loss and social isolation that can lead to serious emotional and health issues for students. If elected, what improvements would you promote to implement during these challenging times?

    More recent data from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children’s Hospital Association indicated that 97,000 children in the U.S. have tested positive for Coronavirus. It is imperative to keep children, school staff, and families at home to reduce spread especially with the rising number of COVID-19 cases in the District and the looming flu season. I believe we need to support families as much as possible with emergency child care. I support the use of community spaces such as libraries, churches, and recreational spaces to serve as alternative learning locations for families who feel comfortable or need support for distance learning.

    Teachers

    On July 1, 2020 DCIST reported Teachers in D.C. Public Schools are pushing back against preliminary plans to reopen schools in the fall, arguing the city school system has not adequately addressed health and safety concerns. Before the pandemic challenges, teachers were being physically and mentally abused in one-on-one personal classroom settings and the students’ behavior has become a big challenge. How do you see yourself being able to address these concerns?

    Implementing a tiered positive behavioral intervention and support (PBIS) framework across all school ages is imperative. This support should begin with our pre-K population in the District. There are federal dollars and national technical assistance centers that can support D.C. with the implementation of a model for free. PBIS can be scaled up to students in older grades through restorative practices. Lastly, we need a baseline of mental health services for all schools so that mental health supports are not treated as a consequence for students with significant behaviors but a resource that can be accessed by all.

     

    Next Candidate >>


  • published Eleanor Ory in 2020 BOE and City-Wide Candidates 2020-09-12 16:12:22 -0400

    Eleanor Ory

    RSVP here for Virtual Town Hall with BOE and other City-Wide Candidates September 16, 2020 at 6:30pm.

    I have lived in DC for over 12 years, but the last 4 have been some of the most difficult as we navigate one of the most difficult times in our nation’s history due to government corruption, climate change, racial and economic injustices, nuclear proliferation, rising autocracy and fighting a pandemic all without Senate representation.  My strategies as Senator will center around obtaining DC Statehood, Statehood transitioning, and elevating DC policy goals.  For obtaining DC Statehood, I support a 2-pronged approach of both traditional advocacy as well as add more direct action components.  Grassroot organizations have been superbly effective at adding cosponsors to H.R.51 and S.631, and I will push to increase funding from $200,000 to 12 million.  Historically civil disobedience has played an important role in struggles for self-governance and full democratic participation.  I think it would be helpful for DC residents to get out into the streets and raise a ruckus.  We achieved Home Rule under Nixon due to protests.  While we should support and fight for a congress that will vote for DC Statehood, we should also supplement those efforts with our voices and our feet.  As a non-Democrat member of the Statehood Commission, I will ensure a more transparent, open-ended, elected, and delegated Constitutional Convention that resembles the more thoughtful process implemented in 1982.  Lastly, I will show up and speak up for DC policy objectives.  I will speak up about and fight for our voice in the Senate.  I will post videos as DC’s Senator on the questions we wish could be asked in hearings, how decisions impact us, and how I would vote.  During key votes, I will show up at the Capitol with my DC flag to remind the Senate that they are voting on an important issue without representation from DC’s constituency.

    Next Candidate >>


Assn Technology & Social Media Strategist, Small Bus Owner, Scuba Diving Fanatic, Political Junkie, and Public Education Advocate. Views expressed are my own.