DC Needs More Women in Political Office

DC currently has an all-time low percentage of women in elected office. It's time to change that.


  • published TownHall 2020 2 Web Page in Home 2020-09-15 16:12:57 -0400

  • published PrefPoll_2_2020 Web Page in Home 2020-09-15 16:07:03 -0400

  • published Karen Williams in 2020 BOE and City-Wide Candidates 2020-09-12 16:13:29 -0400

    Karen Williams

    RSVP here for Virtual Town Hall with BOE and other City-Wide Candidates September 16, 2020 at 6:30pm.

    Hello. My name is Karen Williams and I am the current Ward 7 representative on the D.C. State Board of Education (SBOE), a 5th generation Washingtonian who is a proud product of D.C. Public Schools (Go Ballou Knights!), and a former educator in the DCPS system.

    Working at Stanton Elementary School in Ward 8, helping children East of the River faced with many social and emotional obstacles, fueled my desire to serve on the State Board of Education. Creating equitable educational opportunities for all DCPS students, providing early intervention services for at-risk students and creating opportunities for D.C. children to succeed has been the primary focus of my entire educational career.

    My experience in education policy, public safety, and community organizing are vitally important on the Board of Education. As Vice President and President of the State Board, I put students first, launching our Student Advisory Committee, giving students a bigger voice in Board discussions and operations, and initiating the Board’s District-wide initiative on the retention of qualified teachers.

    My legislative work on the State Board includes collaborating with the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) on the development of the “No Child Left Behind” waivers and graduation requirements, and working with members of SBOE on credit flexibility regulations, as well as the development of the State Diploma for students completing the GED or NEPD programs.

    COVID-19 has shown us our first priority should be to promote the need for DC students and teachers to have safe and well-equipped school environments – clean and well-maintained physical structures, complete staffing and the necessary tools for learning.

    To me, quality education is a right all of our students deserve, and I have the relationships to ensure continued change provides opportunities to underserved and at-risk students.

     

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  • Eboni-Rose Thompson

    RSVP here for Virtual Town Hall with BOE and other City-Wide Candidates September 16, 2020 at 6:30pm.

    Eboni-Rose Thompson, Candidate DC SBOE Ward 7


    Charter Schools vs. DCPS

    Ever-increasing enrollments in DCPCS forced the DCPS chancellor to propose closing fifteen DC Public Schools in an effort to manage scarce resources more efficiently. It’s been more than a decade since DC adopted Charter Schools. Name a specific benefit and challenge with both entities? If elected, what goals do you expect to provide?

    We need a comprehensive plan with a vision for our public education system. That plan should detail how many schools we have and what programs they provide. Without that, we will continue to have what we have now. We will continue to open more schools, stretch resources, and still have families who say we do not have enough high quality schools. Within that plan both DC Public Schools and DC charter schools can contribute their benefits, and we can mitigate their challenges. DC Public Schools benefits are that they serve all children but they have not been able to educate all children equally, which is why many families in Ward 7 do not attend their neighborhood schools in search of higher quality programs. Charter schools have more flexibility to be innovative but lack transparency in their policies and practices, such as how they handle discipline and spend their money.

    If elected, I would work towards the following key accomplishments:

    • reclaiming greater power over the public education landscape and decision-making
    • the board developing a comprehensive education plan that will ensure every student have a high-quality education no matter where they live

    These are both important because they will improve accountability and transparency for schools, families and educators.

    Mental Health

    According to the CDC Mental Disorders among children are described as serious changes in the way children typically learn, behave, or handle their emotions, which cause distress and problems getting through the day. Childhood trauma, being one aspect, is prevalent in some poverty to low income households. If elected, what can voters expect from you to improve this dilemma amongst school age children’s mental health?

    If elected, I would continue to advocate to increase funding for mental health providers to be placed in schools. As chair of the Ward 7 Education Council, I have testified in front of the DC Council advocating for increases to at-risk and mental health funding, both of which can be used to support positions like school counselors, social workers, and school psychologists.  Increasing the number of school based mental health workers is important for the following reasons: 1) their ability to consistently provide care allows clinicians to establish and maintain the relationships needed with families to work towards solutions together; 2) when placed in schools clinicians can support the well-being of the entire school and can work with families, staff and the community more broadly; 3) often it is the most vulnerable that have the most difficulty accessing services due to lack of insurance and placing providers in schools can make sure they are better served.

    Preparing Students academically

    According to the Non-profit Hechinger Report each year, when they get to campus, more than half a million American college students have to take so-called remedial or developmental education classes to teach them basic math and English skills they should have learned in high school. Main-stream media and written newspaper articles have constantly reported how DC students are ill prepared for college and the workforce after Secondary Graduation. If elected what would be a priority of yours to change this dilemma?

     

    I am a native Washingtonian and product of DCPS and DC Charter Schools. I went on to earn my degree from the University of Pennsylvania. After graduating I returned home to work for DC Public Schools. As a DCPS employee, I was able to serve my neighborhood elementary school, the same elementary school I attended from PreK through 5th grade. I share the SBOE vision that we prepare all students with the skills, knowledge and abilities to lead productive lives as engaged citizens within any community.

    My vision for education is all students be prepared to graduate and go on to post-secondary or technical training opportunities that put them on the pathways to fulfilling careers that could pay them a living wage. As a member of the State Board of Education I will continue fighting for academic standards, measures of school quality, and the resources to make this vision a reality. As the Ward 7 SBOE representative, I will push and advocate for us to:

    • focus resources on students and communities with the greatest need
    • provide transparency in budgeting and decision making
    • expand the quantity and quality of programs in our schools.

    Education

    The Coronavirus pandemic has brought on new challenges in the classroom of learning.  In DC textbooks, laptops and school materials are the necessities for a quality learning environment within a classroom setting. The American Academy of Pediatrics, a national association of pediatricians, issued guidance July 1, 2020 advocating for in-person classes in the fall. Remote learning, the academy said, will likely result in severe learning loss and social isolation that can lead to serious emotional and health issues for students. If elected, what improvements would you promote to implement during these challenging times?

    This school year is unlike any other we have faced. The decision when to return to schools in-person must be a health and safety decision first and foremost. As a member of the Mayor’s ReOpen DC committee focused on education, I pushed for the city to invest in closing the digital divide so students and their families remain connected to schools. This is especially important so students can connect with their teachers for academic instruction, but they also need the internet and a device to access other services for general health and mental health services.

     

    Additionally, I would promote the city exploring options like learning pods, use of community resources like churches who have space and volunteers that can provide tutoring to students who need additional support, and ensuring special needs children have individualized learning plans that detail how supports will be provided to meet their needs until we can return to in-person instruction.

    Finally, in my role as the Ward 7 Education Council Chair, we are advocating to ensure the necessary improvements are made to school facilities like addressing HVAC and ventilation issues to allow educators and students to return in person. I would continue that advocacy.

    Teachers

    On July 1, 2020 DCIST reported Teachers in D.C. Public Schools are pushing back against preliminary plans to reopen schools in the fall, arguing the city school system has not adequately addressed health and safety concerns.

    Before the pandemic challenges, teachers were being physically and mentally abused in one-on-one personal classroom settings and the students’ behavior has become a big challenge. How do you see yourself being able to address these concerns?

    Students of color, with disabilities, and in the foster care system In DC are overwhelmingly and disproportionately suspended and expelled. The Fair Access to School Act, a school discipline bill passed by the DC Council in 2018, pushed schools to incorporate restorative justice practices, but many schools had trouble addressing student behaviors without adequately staff and resources. Before the bill, black children in DC were nearly eight times more likely to be suspended than their white peers. Students cannot learn if they are not in school. When fewer kids are suspended, data shows test scores improve. Addressing the root cause behind each child’s behavior leads to a long-term solution that helps every child in the classroom learn and succeed. This is another reason I will continue to advocate for schools to have the necessary funding for school based mental health resources.

     

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  • published Dr. Carlene Reid in 2020 BOE and City-Wide Candidates 2020-09-12 16:12:43 -0400

    Dr. Carlene Reid

    RSVP here for Virtual Town Hall with BOE and other City-Wide Candidates September 16, 2020 at 6:30pm.

    Charter Schools vs. DCPS

    Ever-increasing enrollments in DCPCS forced the DCPS chancellor to propose closing fifteen DC Public Schools in an effort to manage scarce resources more efficiently. It’s been more than a decade since DC adopted Charter Schools. Name a specific benefit and challenge with both entities? If elected, what goals do you expect to provide?

    A challenge of DCPS is chronic underfunding. Traditional public schools in Ward 8 are still recovering from the effects of segregation and redlining which prevented minority families from equally accessing educational opportunities. Therefore, these schools in particular need increased funding to support inequities caused by systemic racism and oppression. Charter schools bring elements of innovation to education; however the influx of charters in the ward has led to instability in our educational system as some have not been able to remain open due to performance or financial difficulty. If elected my goal is to engage neighbors around a moratorium on opening new schools in Ward 8, as our current system continues to bring in new schools at a rate faster than it is able to fund or monitor for accountability and quality improvement efforts. Instead, my focus will be on fortifying the current schools in the ward, both DCPS and charter.

    Mental Health

    According to the CDC Mental Disorders among children are described as serious changes in the way children typically learn, behave, or handle their emotions, which cause distress and problems getting through the day. Childhood trauma, being one aspect, is prevalent in some poverty to low income households. If elected, what can voters expect from you to improve this dilemma amongst school age children’s mental health?

    First, I believe a universal screening for adverse childhood events (ACES) should be provided to all children regularly and at multiple touch points in their educational journeys. Second, I would advocate for funding services for families who are not eligible for medicaid reimbursement and frequently denied mental health supports by for profit community based organizations. My advocacy would include families who may be undocumented, have no insurance, or private insurance.

    Preparing Students academically

    According to the Non-profit Hechinger Report each year, when they get to campus, more than half a million American college students have to take so-called remedial or developmental education classes to teach them basic math and English skills they should have learned in high school. Main-stream media and written newspaper articles have constantly reported how DC students are ill prepared for college and the workforce after Secondary Graduation. If elected what would be a priority of yours to change this dilemma?

    One priority would be to reduce the pressure for teachers to expedite learning experiences caused by standardized testing. Additionally, I will advocate for our teachers to have adequate professional development opportunities (i.e college coursework, licensure maintenance, conferences, etc.) to keep them abreast of current instructional methodologies that research has proven to render the most fruitful outcomes in students.

    Education

    The Coronavirus pandemic has brought on new challenges in the classroom of learning. In DC textbooks, laptops and school materials are the necessities for a quality learning environment within a classroom setting. The American Academy of Pediatrics, a national association of pediatricians, issued guidance July 1, 2020 advocating for in-person classes in the fall. Remote learning, the academy said, will likely result in severe learning loss and social isolation that can lead to serious emotional and health issues for students. If elected, what improvements would you promote to implement during these challenging times?

    More recent data from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children’s Hospital Association indicated that 97,000 children in the U.S. have tested positive for Coronavirus. It is imperative to keep children, school staff, and families at home to reduce spread especially with the rising number of COVID-19 cases in the District and the looming flu season. I believe we need to support families as much as possible with emergency child care. I support the use of community spaces such as libraries, churches, and recreational spaces to serve as alternative learning locations for families who feel comfortable or need support for distance learning.

    Teachers

    On July 1, 2020 DCIST reported Teachers in D.C. Public Schools are pushing back against preliminary plans to reopen schools in the fall, arguing the city school system has not adequately addressed health and safety concerns. Before the pandemic challenges, teachers were being physically and mentally abused in one-on-one personal classroom settings and the students’ behavior has become a big challenge. How do you see yourself being able to address these concerns?

    Implementing a tiered positive behavioral intervention and support (PBIS) framework across all school ages is imperative. This support should begin with our pre-K population in the District. There are federal dollars and national technical assistance centers that can support D.C. with the implementation of a model for free. PBIS can be scaled up to students in older grades through restorative practices. Lastly, we need a baseline of mental health services for all schools so that mental health supports are not treated as a consequence for students with significant behaviors but a resource that can be accessed by all.

     

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  • published Eleanor Ory in 2020 BOE and City-Wide Candidates 2020-09-12 16:12:22 -0400

    Eleanor Ory

    RSVP here for Virtual Town Hall with BOE and other City-Wide Candidates September 16, 2020 at 6:30pm.

    I have lived in DC for over 12 years, but the last 4 have been some of the most difficult as we navigate one of the most difficult times in our nation’s history due to government corruption, climate change, racial and economic injustices, nuclear proliferation, rising autocracy and fighting a pandemic all without Senate representation.  My strategies as Senator will center around obtaining DC Statehood, Statehood transitioning, and elevating DC policy goals.  For obtaining DC Statehood, I support a 2-pronged approach of both traditional advocacy as well as add more direct action components.  Grassroot organizations have been superbly effective at adding cosponsors to H.R.51 and S.631, and I will push to increase funding from $200,000 to 12 million.  Historically civil disobedience has played an important role in struggles for self-governance and full democratic participation.  I think it would be helpful for DC residents to get out into the streets and raise a ruckus.  We achieved Home Rule under Nixon due to protests.  While we should support and fight for a congress that will vote for DC Statehood, we should also supplement those efforts with our voices and our feet.  As a non-Democrat member of the Statehood Commission, I will ensure a more transparent, open-ended, elected, and delegated Constitutional Convention that resembles the more thoughtful process implemented in 1982.  Lastly, I will show up and speak up for DC policy objectives.  I will speak up about and fight for our voice in the Senate.  I will post videos as DC’s Senator on the questions we wish could be asked in hearings, how decisions impact us, and how I would vote.  During key votes, I will show up at the Capitol with my DC flag to remind the Senate that they are voting on an important issue without representation from DC’s constituency.

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  • Eleanor Holmes Norton

    RSVP here for Virtual Town Hall with BOE and other City-Wide Candidates September 16, 2020 at 6:30pm.

    Eleanor Holmes Norton
    Delegate
    U.S. House of Representatives

    DC Women in Politics Platform Statement

    My platform builds on my major accomplishment—the first ever passage of a D.C. Statehood bill as well as the advantages my service brings to D.C. residents because of my seniority and my rank as a subcommittee chair. If I am reelected, I will make my first priority moving my statehood bill forward in the Senate. Polls show that Democrats are likely to control the Senate and that Joe Biden, who supports D.C. Statehood, will be elected president. Although Senate rules make it more difficult to get bills passed than the House, chances are that 2021 will allow us to make significant progress on D.C. statehood, so soon after getting the bill through the House this year.

    My other priorities include: removing the amendments that keeps D.C. from spending D.C. funds on abortion for low income women; obtaining funding for DCTAG, a unique bill allowing D.C. students to attend any state supported U.S. college; continued funding for federal agencies to locate on St. Elizabeth’s campus, bringing much needed commercial activity to Ward 8;  transferring the RFK stadium site to D.C.; getting $755 million D.C. lost when D.C. was treated as a territory by Republicans when they managed the CARES Act; and getting Senate passage of the new surface transportation reauthorization bill passed by the House that I helped write, including 10 years of capital funding for Metro.  

     

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  • published Sarah Mehrotra in 2020 BOE and City-Wide Candidates 2020-09-12 16:11:39 -0400

    Sarah Mehrotra

    RSVP here for Virtual Town Hall with BOE and other City-Wide Candidates September 16, 2020 at 6:30pm.


     

    Charter Schools vs. DCPS

    Ever-increasing enrollments in DCPCS forced the DCPS chancellor to propose closing fifteen DC Public Schools in an effort to manage scarce resources more efficiently. It’s been more than a decade since DC adopted Charter Schools. Name a specific benefit and challenge with both entities? If elected, what goals do you expect to provide?

    I believe in investing in our neighborhood public schools. So often in education, the challenge is less about a lack of resources, and more about a lack of political will to make change. On the SBOE, I will ensure on day one that I fight for investing in our community public schools. 

    Mental Health

    According to the CDC Mental Disorders among children are described as serious changes in the way children typically learn, behave, or handle their emotions, which cause distress and problems getting through the day. Childhood trauma, being one aspect, is prevalent in some poverty to low income households. If elected, what can voters expect from you to improve this dilemma amongst school age children’s mental health?

    Improving mental health resources is one of my top priorities. Growing up, I was one of the many children who received mental health supports from school. Unfortunately, we are lacking in adequate support in DC: the American School Counselor Association recommends a student-to-school-counselor ratio of 250:1. Here in DC, that ratio is 514:1. The pandemic has made mental health support more important than ever. Students’ whole lives have been upended overnight - they lost their routine, peer-to-peer interaction, and are seeing family members’ health put at risk. Allocating funding for school counselors, social workers, and psychologists will be my priority on day one. 

    Preparing Students academically

    According to the Non-profit Hechinger Report each year, when they get to campus, more than half a million American college students have to take so-called remedial or developmental education classes to teach them basic math and English skills they should have learned in high school. Main-stream media and written newspaper articles have constantly reported how DC students are ill prepared for college and the workforce after Secondary Graduation. If elected what would be a priority of yours to change this dilemma?

    One of the many roles schools play is preparing students for colleges and careers. As a SBOE representative, I will prioritize partnering with local small businesses and organizations across Wards to set up internships. These internships will both give students hands-on learning experience and foster community investment from organizations in our students and schools. 

    Education

    The Coronavirus pandemic has brought on new challenges in the classroom of learning.  In DC textbooks, laptops and school materials are the necessities for a quality learning environment within a classroom setting. The American Academy of Pediatrics, a national association of pediatricians, issued guidance July 1, 2020 advocating for in-person classes in the fall. Remote learning, the academy said, will likely result in severe learning loss and social isolation that can lead to serious emotional and health issues for students. If elected, what improvements would you promote to implement during these challenging times?

    I believe that the decision to go back to in person learning should be made with all stakeholders at the table: teachers, families, OSSE, SBOE, and public health experts. We cannot reopen schools until we have community buy-in from all of these groups. In the meanwhile, it is imperative to establish learning pods and outdoor learning programs. 

    Teachers

    On July 1, 2020 DCIST reported Teachers in D.C. Public Schools are pushing back against preliminary plans to reopen schools in the fall, arguing the city school system has not adequately addressed health and safety concerns.

    Before the pandemic challenges, teachers were being physically and mentally abused in one-on-one personal classroom settings and the students’ behavior has become a big challenge. How do you see yourself being able to address these concerns?

    One of my top priorities is protecting teachers. We in DC have one of the highest teacher turnover rates in the country - and it is because we do not listen to and value teachers as we should. When it comes to providing supports for teaching, my first step will be listening to teachers through focus groups, school climate surveys and exit surveys when they leave the classroom. 

     

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  • LaJoy Johnson-Law

    RSVP here for Virtual Town Hall with BOE and other City-Wide Candidates September 16, 2020 at 6:30pm.

    Candidate: LaJoy Johnson-Law        Position Sought: State Board of Education Ward 8

    Address: 3702 2nd St SE Apt D, WDC, 20032

    Email: ljohnsonlaw22@gmail.com

    Phone#: 202-553-4460

     

    Charter Schools vs. DCPS

    Ever-increasing enrollments in DCPCS forced the DCPS chancellor to propose closing fifteen DC Public Schools in an effort to manage scarce resources more efficiently. It’s been more than a decade since DC adopted Charter Schools. Name a specific benefit and challenge with both entities? If elected, what goals do you expect to provide?

    I believe there needs to be a cohesive approach within our education system, which led me to write an op-ed in The Washington Post detailing the need for greater charter school transparency in the District of Columbia. A cohesive education system is crucial to ensure balanced and equitable outcomes for all of our children. All of our schools receive public dollars and should be subject to the same requirements across the board. Often, families are very confused about the different standards with over 60 LEAs. It is imperative to the success of our city and our government's democratic principles that we have a cohesive system of education, which includes both DCPS and DC Charter Schools -- especially for Special Education and ELL students. I will champion and collaborate with all stakeholders to achieve a cohesive education system by making sure I engage families, teachers, students, and all education stakeholders.

    Mental Health

    According to the CDC Mental Disorders among children are described as serious changes in the way children typically learn, behave, or handle their emotions, which cause distress and problems getting through the day. Childhood trauma, being one aspect, is prevalent in some poverty to low income households. If elected, what can voters expect from you to improve this dilemma amongst school age children’s mental health?

    I believe we should all be champions for Mental Health in our schools and ensure our students, families, teachers, and schools have the necessary mental health support to survive, persist, and thrive -- both in school and in life. In light of COVID19, it is even more critical that our schools have mental health supports. We should all be advocates to ensure that we fully fund the DC Department of Behavioral Health’s (DBH) proposed school-based mental health expansion with a $16 million budget allocation. We must increase DBH’s budget when our system is already strained to deploy providers to schools. It is

    counterproductive and potentially deadly to cut DBH’s budget, especially when COVID-19 disproportionately impacts Ward 8 residents and, as a result, bear the brunt of the mental health repercussions of this pandemic. If elected, I will continue to champion for mental health resources for all of our schools. All of our students, families, teachers, and schools deserve quality mental health resources.

    Preparing Students Academically

    According to the Non-profit Hechinger Report each year, when they get to campus, more than half a million American college students have to take so-called remedial or developmental education classes to teach them basic math and English skills they should have learned in high school. Main-stream media and written newspaper articles have constantly reported how DC students are ill prepared for college and the workforce after Secondary Graduation. If elected what would be a priority of yours to change this dilemma?

    Our education system must ensure that our DC students are prepared for life after they leave school. If elected, I will push for more technical and vocational training, college readiness, financial literacy, and life skills courses. Our students should be holistic individuals and be given every option to ensure they are ready for life after DC education. I will also be a champion for families to make these decisions with their students in regards to determining new standards to ensure our children have every option to succeed.

    Education

    The Coronavirus pandemic has brought on new challenges in the classroom of learning. In DC textbooks, laptops and school materials are the necessities for a quality learning environment within a classroom setting. The American Academy of Pediatrics, a national association of pediatricians, issued guidance July 1, 2020 advocating for in-person classes in the fall. Remote learning, the academy said, will likely result in severe learning loss and social isolation that can lead to serious emotional and health issues for students. If elected, what improvements would you promote to implement during these challenging times?

    Our schools should only open when it is safe for everyone. We should have a Caregiver/Families centered approach that will ensure we design a strategy that will meet the needs of families to provide more robust student engagement. When schools partner and design solutions with families and teachers to address their concerns -- our children thrive.

    Our teachers are our family, and we want all families in our community to be safe, and right now, that means participating in distance learning. Academic loss can be fixed, but we cannot fix the loss of life.

    Teachers

    On July 1, 2020 DCIST reported Teachers in D.C. Public Schools are pushing back against preliminary plans to reopen schools in the fall, arguing the city school system has not adequately addressed health and safety concerns. Before the pandemic challenges, teachers were being physically and mentally abused in one-on-one personal classroom settings and the students’ behavior has become a big challenge. How do you see yourself being able to address these concerns?

    As a city, we need to ensure that teachers are trained and equipped to support every student regardless of ability or need. If elected to the SBOE, I will ensure that teachers receive high- quality training in trauma-informed practices and technical skills about assisting students with diverse needs. I will also promote a deep partnership between the Department of Behavioral Health and all schools to ensure that schools and teachers have the resources and expertise that they need to thrive. We must equip teachers and families with the tools they need to be the best advocates. We can only do that if we provide quality training and resources to those charged with stewarding the next generation.

     

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  • Barbara Washington Franklin

    RSVP here for Virtual Town Hall with BOE and other City-Wide Candidates September 16, 2020 at 6:30pm.

    I am Barbara Washington Franklin and I’m running as an Independent for D.C. Delegate to end second-class citizenship in the District of Columbia.  Now is the time for new leadership.  What we tolerate we cannot change.  DC Statehood is not a partisan issue – it is a civil rights issue that requires nonpartisan and independent action.

    I began my adult work life as a social worker in the New Jersey foster care system.  After graduating from Rutgers University Law School, I worked for the New York City Corporation Counsel, then moved to Washington to become Minority Chief Counsel and Staff Director of the U.S. House Committee on the District of Columbia.  I then served in the mayor’s office as an Assistant City Administrator before forming my own civil litigation law practice.

    The Issues – What I Pledge to Do

    DC Statehood & Home Rule – Leverage the symbolism of Congress’s first vote on DC Statehood into a movement that will raise the consciousness of all Americans to demand full citizenship for DC residents.

    Public Safety Reform – Demand that public safety be treated as a local issue.  Protect DC residents and local law enforcement authority from federal intrusion, especially attempts to militarize community policing.  Ensure federal support for law enforcement reform that respects local autonomy.

    Strengthening Human Services – Seek increased federal support to address DC’s persistent health disparities and the vulnerabilities of our health systems.  Because a good living environment promotes good health, fight to reverse disinvestment in public housing and increase pathways to safe, stable and affordable housing for all DC residents. 

     

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  • published Dorothy Douglas in 2020 BOE and City-Wide Candidates 2020-09-12 16:10:28 -0400

    Dorothy Douglas

    RSVP here for Virtual Town Hall with BOE and other City-Wide Candidates September 16, 2020 at 6:30pm.

    My name is Dorothy Douglas and I have over 40 years of experience in the field of Education. I have voluntarily been a community advocate dedicated her life to improving the quality of education for students. I am currently a (PAVE) Board Member Parent Amplifying Voice in Education. Appointed to the Underground Project Consumer Education Taskforce (UPCEF)Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) Ward 7 member by Mayor Muriel Bowser 2018 - present. I was formerly Ward 7 DC State Board of Education the First Woman Elected to the New State Board of Education.

    Throughout my tenure on the Ward 7 DC State Board of Education and Reform Task Force the National Association of Education 2008, we had successfully ensured a strategic and effectively academic Standards of Curriculum which led us to win a $ 75 million federal grant. The funds were divided over 4 years to Provide STEM programs in public and charter schools in each ward in Washington DC.

    As an educational public servant, I will continue to support the advancement of educational enrichment and opportunity for students no matter the demographic or socioeconomic status. I will continue to take action against injustice and racism come together to protect Equality and advocate human rights for children and families those who feel they are not being heard and ensure they seriously and rights are respected. keep our children safe and Healthy during the COVID-19 Public Emergency Global Pandemic working with Local Education Agencies (OSSE) and the DC Disease Control to plan effectively safe programs for re-opening school and teacher’s workplace where it's (Virtually) in-person fall semester 2020. Dorothy Douglas is a native Washingtonian and graduate of District of Columbia University holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Elementary Education, a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc, and attended DC Public Schools. She has 3 children, Grandchildren 10, Great-grandchildren 3, and 4 Foster children.

    We must place value in every education tool that cultivates each student's educational progress. This is why I implore you to not only consider my work history but what we will accomplish in the near future once I'm elected on the At-large State Board of Education. FAMILIES and FRIENDS VOTE DOROTHY DOUGLAS FOR OUR CHILDREN on November 3rd, 2020 because she understands Parent Priorities and their children's needs to learn and to thrive in DC Public and Charter Schools.

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  • published 2020 BOE and City-Wide Candidates in Blog 2020-09-12 15:58:14 -0400

  • published PrefPoll2020 At-Large Web Page in Home 2020-08-22 18:38:31 -0400

    2020 At-Large Preference Poll

    Read statements provided by the Candidates for members of DCWIP:
    https://www.dcwomeninpolitics.org/2020_dc_council_at_large_candidates

    We will share the results of the preference poll via email and on our website.

    Please complete the Preference Poll no later than Sept 15, 2020.

    Take the survey

  • DC Women in Politics Touts Historic Election As Council Poised to Elect Female Majority

    We support Kamala Harris, and we will support the female candidates for DC Council At-Large because when women unite and vote, women win.

    In three months, residents of the District of Columbia head to the polls to vote in the general election but the historic choice on Nov. 3 will be about much more than the presidential candidates.

    DC Women in Politics is organizing to elect the seventh woman to the Council of the District of Columbia, establishing a female majority for the first time.

    The women vying for a non-majority-party, at-large seat on the 13-member council are: Claudia Barragan, Christina Henderson, Kathy Henderson, A'Shia Howard, Jeanné Lewis, Mónica Palacio, Marya Pickering, and Ann Wilcox.

    “It is women's political participation that will yield change for democracy,” said Anita Shelton, chairwoman of DC Women in Politics. “At a time when the District of Columbia is heavily burdened by the call for social and economic justice for women and people of color as well as the novel coronavirus, women’s natural problem-solving skills and compassion are the dual qualities that make their leadership distinctive.”

    Shelton continued: “Those qualities compel women to take on family and community concerns. They have done so numerous times by managing the household budget, strategizing in corporate boardrooms, or helping the local PTA advance its goals. So, it matters when their unique leadership capabilities are also at work in electoral politics.”

    A successful bid by any candidate to advance the District of Columbia is also a vote for advancement of a progressive women’s agenda, which includes working to end income inequality, expensive childcare, domestic violence, sexual harassment in the workplace and exorbitant housing costs.

    DC Women in Politics has long outlined such issues while training and mentoring women seeking office because they are the issues that burden a woman’s progress.

    With deft strategy (centered on its motto: When women vote, women win!) the organization has gained a track record for assisting in the election of women willing to bolster women’s equality.

    For example, DC Women in Politics endorsed Brooke Pinto and Janeese Lewis George, who won their primary races on June 2 to represent Ward 2 and Ward 4, respectively. They join a corps of elected leaders who are alumni of DC Women in Politics’ Campaign School, including councilmembers Elissa Silverman and Brianne Nadeau. Also, its Preference Poll winners include Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) and Mayor Muriel Bowser, and councilmembers Anita Bonds and Mary Cheh.

    “A historic election of a seventh woman to the Council of the District of Columbia would bring increased sensitivity to citizen needs, compromise across party lines, and produce a maintainable future,” Shelton said.

    Please join us as a member of DC Women in Politics. 


  • published 2020 Ward 2 Special Election June 16 in Blog 2020-06-12 16:10:51 -0400

    2020 Ward 2 Special Election June 16

    We hope you are all staying healthy and safe. As you may have heard, Brooke Pinto, has won the Ward 2 DC Council Democratic Primary Election. She will go on to be the Democratic nominee in the General Election this November 3rd, 2020 to hold the Council seat for the next four years. Brooke won our preference poll in May.  We are thrilled that she will represent Ward 2 and be the first woman to serve as the Ward 2 Council member. 

    Brooke previously served as a tax attorney in the Office of the Attorney General and then as the Assistant Attorney General for Policy and Legislative Affairs during which time she represented the Council and many of the District agencies as her clients. She wrote important pieces of legislation on issues such as hate crimes, small business protection, and workers rights. Brooke was the only candidate in the race with a comprehensive COVID-19 Recovery Plan. She hopes to get to work right away to help our city recover from this crisis and to ensure that Ward 2 and D.C. are more equitable and just. You can find more information about Brooke's background and platform at https://brookepintoforward2.com/vision/.

    We want to bring to your attention that Brooke is also running in the Ward 2 Special Election on June 16th. This election will determine who will fill the vacant Council seat left by Jack Evans for the remainder of this term until January. All of the other candidates have dropped out or conceded from the Special Election; however, since the ballot has already been finalized, their names are still listed. Regardless of who you voted for in the Primary, it is crucial that we all turn out to vote in the Special Election and support Brooke so that she is able to immediately join the ranks of the other progressive women on the Council and represent Ward 2 during budget negotiations in early July. 

    There are a few ways you can help elect Brooke in the June 16th Special Election: 

    1) Vote! 

    • Some of you may have already received your Special Election mail-in ballot. If so, make sure to return your ballot by June 16th either to a polling location or through the mail. You can check the status of your mail-in ballot here
    • Unfortunately, the deadline to order a mail-in ballot for the Special Election has already passed, but you can still vote safely in person.  Early voting will take place from June 12th through June 15th at Hardy Middle School and One Judiciary Square from 8:30am-7pm. On June 16th, both of the polling locations will be open from 7am-8pm. The same social distancing protocols that were in place for the Primary Election will still be followed. All voters will be required to wear a mask and election workers will stay distanced.

    2) Tell your Ward 2 friends about Brooke

    • If you are not a Ward 2 resident, you can still support Brooke's candidacy by spreading the word about her campaign. Tell your Ward 2 friends about the importance of the Special Election and encourage them to support Brooke. 

    3) Volunteer

    • Brooke's campaign is looking for volunteers to help phone bank and to represent the campaign at the polling locations. If you are interested in volunteering, email Rose Ettleson, Brooke's Field Director, at community@brookepintoforward2.com.

    If you have any questions or experience any difficulties voting, please reach out to Brooke's campaign at community@brookepintoforward2.com

    “When women vote, women win,”
    Anita Shelton, President of DCWIP.   

    Please join us as a member of DC Women in Politics here. 


  • published 2020 Primary Results in Press Room 2020-06-03 18:07:10 -0400

    2020 Primary Results

    DC Women in Politics (DCWIP) congratulates our recommended candidates Brooke Pinto, Ward 2, and Janeese Lewis George, Ward 4! We stand with our next generation of progressive leaders, Brooke Pinto and Janeese Lewis George, who are committed to change. “When women vote, women win,” Anita Shelton, President of DCWIP.    

    We stand with the protestors calling for justice for George Floyd and others subject to police brutality. The cry from George Floyd, "mama, mama" as he took his last breath by the heinous actions of four officers of the Minneapolis Police Department breaks our hearts.

    For women and supporters to hear that call, it was a plea for action against racism and gender disparities. It is time for us to act decisively and reform our police departments into community policing departments. Our country and our city are in mourning and each of us must do our part to affect change. Join with DC Women in Politics to combat and end police brutality, discrimination and gender inequities.

    Please join us as a member of DC Women in Politics here. 


  • published Preference Poll 2020 Results in Press Room 2020-05-04 17:06:33 -0400

    Preference Poll 2020 Results

    DCWIP PREFERENCE POLL SHOWS MOST DESIRED CANDIDATES IN
    WARDS 2, 4, 7, 8 DURING COVID-19 

     

    WASHINGTON, DC, May 4, 2020 — A DC Women in Politics (DCWIP) online preference poll shows a majority support District of Columbia City Council candidates Brook Pinto (Ward 2), Janeese Lewis George (Ward 4), Veda Rasheed (Ward 7) and Yaida O. Ford (Ward 8). 

     

    Read more

  • published Maintain Group in Join 2020-04-29 11:10:16 -0400

  • published Organizing Team in Join 2020-04-29 11:10:00 -0400

  • published General Membership in Join 2020-04-29 11:07:59 -0400

Assn Technology & Social Media Strategist, Small Bus Owner, Scuba Diving Fanatic, Political Junkie, and Public Education Advocate. Views expressed are my own.